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CANDIDATE FORUM Q & A:


SALT LAKE COUNTY MAYOR (If you live anywhere in Salt Lake County, one of these candidates will be your Mayor) - Ben McAdams | Mark Crockett

SALT LAKE COUNTY COUNCIL AT LARGE (If you live anywhere in Salt Lake County, one of these candidates will represent you on the County Council) - Joseph Demma | Jim Bradley

SALT LAKE COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT #2 (District #2 represents the western part of the valley, including Kearns, Magna, Herriman, parts of So. Jordan, Riverton, Bluffdale and other areas) -

SALT LAKE COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT #4 (District #4 represents Millcreek, Holladay, Cottonwood Heights along with a part of Salt Lake City and other areas) - Missy Larsen

SALT LAKE COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT #6 (District #6 represents District #6 covers Draper, Sandy, parts of Midvale and other areas) - Paul Recanzone | Max Burdick






Mark Crockett - Please See FLyer


Ben McAdams

  1. MF: Do you have a dog?

    BM: Not yet - much to our children's dismay! We are in the process of finding the right rescue dog for our family - we want to make sure it is something our children (twins, Kate and James - 7, Robert - 3, Isaac - 1) are ready for the responsibility that comes with having a dog. We enjoy dog sitting often for friends and relatives, a service that only increases our appetite to complete our family with a four-legged addition.

  2. MF: Do you exercise with your dog off leash?

    BM: Off leash exercise will be an important part of our dog's exercise regimen. I understand the need for dogs to be able to run and socialize freely to be healthy and happy, and I also know that there will be plenty of times our dog will want to run faster than we can!

  3. MF: Do you consider us a viable user group that deserves open space to recreate with their animals off-leash?

    BM: I do - Salt Lake County is so fortunate to have the available open space for off leash dog recreation, and I believe that F.I.D.O.S. is a great partner in shaping public policy. I believe in bringing all stakeholders to the table in order to find solutions regarding the challenges we face as a community, and I value F.I.D.O.S. as a serious stakeholder when it comes to open space and quality of life issues in Salt Lake County.

  4. MF: There are two types of dog parks, large open spaces where people can exercise along with their dogs and small neighborhood fenced areas where people tend to stand around while their dogs play with other dogs. Do you understand the need for both types and when each is appropriate?

    BM: I understand the need for both and that there is a large difference between the two. Dogs need large open spaces to exercise off leash - dogs that have that kind of exercise regularly are generally happier, healthier, and less likely to cause complaints because of excessive barking or property destruction. We also need smaller neighborhood areas to foster a sense of community among dog-owners and allow dogs to socialize with other people and their pets. Both types are important in shaping the growth of Salt Lake County because they allow all residents a higher quality of life, and make our county an attractive place for people to live, work, and play.

  5. MF: According to the Trust for Public Lands (source: USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2011-12-07/dog-parks/51715340/1), nationally during the last five years dog parks were developed at a rate of 34% as opposed to all other parks which stood at 3%. Salt Lake County government has added no off-leash space in that same period of time. Salt Lake County operates only one off-leash area, Millcreek Canyon, which admittedly is a great resource. However, in light of the fast growing needs of this user group, what do you promise to do to develop more space for off-leash use of both kinds (particularly large, recreational open space) that are well distributed throughout the county?

    BM: Salt Lake County is growing rapidly, and the need for a variety of recreation areas is something that must be addressed. As Salt Lake County mayor, I promise to take this need seriously and work with F.I.D.O.S. and other stakeholders to find solutions to the issue of the lack of large, recreational off-leash areas in our county. We are privileged to have such an abundance of open space in Salt Lake County, and I believe we can find a balance that is fair and equitable for our community.

  6. MF: There is a small but very vocal contingent of well connected people who oppose the use of open space for off-leash recreation. There is a much larger passive group who are forced to quietly break the law due to the lack of well distributed legal off-leash space (Even you might be part of this group!). Dog walkers are an easy target for criticism. Are you willing to stand up against a vocal minority to enhance the lives of such a large group of constituents?

    BM: Although I do not support breaking the law, I do understand that this behavior is a symptom of the larger problem. I believe that all residents should feel empowered and given the ability to voice their concerns, and in doing that we should be able to find common ground and create solutions to these issues.

    I also believe this is an issue on which the people of Salt Lake County need to be better educated - if we can gain a better understanding of one another I think it will help stem criticism and foster compassion.



Joseph Demma

  1. MF: Do you have a dog?

    JD: Lisa and I have two dogs. Zoey is a 3-year old female Chocolate Lab and Andee is a 2-year old female Border-Collie/Pointer.


  2. MF: Do you exercise with your dog off leash?

    JD: My wife and I exercise our pups off-leash where it is legal and appropriate. In addition to their backyard exercise and daily walks, Zoey and Andee love to mess around off-leash at Tanner Park. Zoey, in particular, absolutely loves to swim in the river and chase balls throughout the expanse of the park. Andee is a blue-ribbon, first place winner in both Agility and Rally, while Zoey is a blue-ribbon winner in dock-jumping. Lisa and I compete our dogs in various trials regularly, in addition to their daily exercise.


  3. MF: Do you consider us a viable user group that deserves open space to recreate with their animals off-leash?

    JD: I find significant value in every group of residents that organize to help influence public policy. Without that interaction, the public loses a valuable voice.


  4. MF: There are two types of dog parks, large open spaces where people can exercise along with their dogs and small neighborhood fenced areas where people tend to stand around while their dogs play with other dogs. Do you understand the need for both types and when each is appropriate?

    JD: As an owner of two energetic pups, I have encountered both the off-leash open space and the off-leash fenced areas. I think both are productive means of exercise. However, I believe that if the ?fenced-in' variety of off-leash is the only kind of recreation for a dog (while better than nothing), it should not be the only means of exercise. My pups tend to encounter aggression during their time in ?fenced-in' parks, so we don't take them there anymore.


  5. MF: According to the Trust for Public Lands (source: USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2011-12-07/dog-parks/51715340/1), nationally during the last five years dog parks were developed at a rate of 34% as opposed to all other parks which stood at 3%. Salt Lake County government has added no off-leash space in that same period of time. Salt Lake County operates only one off-leash area, Millcreek Canyon, which admittedly is a great resource. However, in light of the fast growing needs of this user group, what do you promise to do to develop more space for off-leash use of both kinds (particularly large, recreational open space) that are well distributed throughout the county?

    JD: As a potential elected official, I can only promise to support the possibilities for off-leash opportunities. I fully understand that many people have problems with dog-droppings littering multi-use areas. Lisa and I are actively aware of that perception and we often clean up after others. If, as a County, we can continue to engage dog owners to be more responsible, we can shift the paradigm entirely. Until then, perception will be reality and we must understand that.


  6. MF: There is a small but very vocal contingent of well connected people who oppose the use of open space for off-leash recreation. There is a much larger passive group who are forced to quietly break the law due to the lack of well distributed legal off-leash space (Even you might be part of this group!). Dog walkers are an easy target for criticism. Are you willing to stand up against a vocal minority to enhance the lives of such a large group of constituents?

    JD: Lisa and I hike to Dog-Lake with our pups and we see many people with their pups off-leash. When hiking up to Dog-Lake, we always keep our dogs on-leash, as is required. I do not support the breaking of the law, passively or otherwise.

    Ok, there is one possible and tiny exception to that: when we get to the lake, I take the leash off of my Zoey. She loves the lake and loves to swim. I guess someone will have to arrest and sue me. It'll be worth it.







Jim Bradley

  1. MF: Do you have a dog?

    JB: I do not currently have a dog, but I have two great paintings of my dog Spot on my office wall.

  2. MF: Do you exercise with your dog off leash?

    JB: Not applicable.

  3. MF: Do you consider us a viable user group that deserves open space to recreate with their animals off-leash?

    JB: FIDOS has a long history of advocacy for open spaces to recreate with dogs. Many of the open spaces available for these purposes today are a direct result of FIDOS’ involvement, advocacy, and encouragement. These successes, in and of themselves, speak to the viability of FIDOS.

  4. MF: There are two types of dog parks, large open spaces where people can exercise along with their dogs and small neighborhood fenced areas where people tend to stand around while their dogs play with other dogs. Do you understand the need for both types and when each is appropriate?

    JB: As a long-time advocate of a variety of recreational experiences throughout Salt Lake County, I appreciate the need for both on-leash and off-leash areas for dog owners.

  5. MF: According to the Trust for Public Lands (source: USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2011-12-07/dog-parks/51715340/1), nationally during the last five years dog parks were developed at a rate of 34% as opposed to all other parks which stood at 3%. Salt Lake County government has added no off-leash space in that same period of time. Salt Lake County operates only one off-leash area, Millcreek Canyon, which admittedly is a great resource. However, in light of the fast growing needs of this user group, what do you promise to do to develop more space for off-leash use of both kinds (particularly large, recreational open space) that are well distributed throughout the county?

    JB: My record on parks and open spaces of all types is clear. Parks and open spaces add to the quality of life in a community and it takes leadership to land bank for the future. As a Commissioner I brokered the deal with the US Forest Service to install the fee station at the base of Millcreek Canyon. Every dollar raised goes back into the Canyon and the improvements made over the past several years have made that Canyon the recreational gem it is today – for all users. Millcreek Canyon was one of the first designated off-leash dog areas in Salt Lake County.

    I am also proud of the lands purchased with the 2006 Voter-approved open space bond. The $48 million spent acquiring lands during boom construction years in Salt Lake valley were dollars well spent. Today, land is less expensive and borrowing rates are at rock bottom. I am 100% supportive of the park development bond that Mayor Corroon won approval to put before the voters this November – I only wish that the Council would have seen the wisdom of funding the full land purchase list. In the future, land will not get cheaper and there will not be additional acreage created within Salt Lake County – yet the population will continue to grow. The decisions we make today regarding land acquisition and open space will shape the future of open space uses for all, including dog owners.


  6. MF: There is a small but very vocal contingent of well connected people who oppose the use of open space for off-leash recreation. There is a much larger passive group who are forced to quietly break the law due to the lack of well distributed legal off-leash space (Even you might be part of this group!). Dog walkers are an easy target for criticism. Are you willing to stand up against a vocal minority to enhance the lives of such a large group of constituents?

    JB: I have never known FIDOS as a group to be “passive” in their advocacy for recreational opportunities. Part of the business of public recreation is balancing the needs of competing interest groups. I believe that in general Salt Lake County does a pretty good job.



Missy Larsen

  1. MF: Do you have a dog?

    MWL: Yes. We have an Irish Water Spaniel - Tosh? Full name Peter Irie Tosh. If you know of this breed you will know why we named him after a Jamaican reggae musician. He is very playful and a very good dog.

  2. MF: Do you exercise with your dog off leash?

    MWL: Because Tosh is a larger and playful breed, we are careful about off-leash exercise outside of our yard. We do take him to the nearby schoolyard for long range play and unleash him once there and my son takes him on hikes in nearby Millcreek Canyon. His regular walks are leashed, but he is getting better at staying close as he ages. He spends his days outside in our backyard where his favorite pastime is retrieving anything and everything and begging anyone near to throw it again! He is also quite fond of chasing birds and squirrels and has built up an ability to throw up a rope and catch it? a very funny site!

  3. MF: Do you consider us a viable user group that deserves open space to recreate with their animals off-leash?

    MWL: Any group that works together for common interest to inform and influence is viable and important! Part of my ?Building Community? initiative is getting people more involved in the process. I do understand the need for people to exercise their dogs off-leash.

  4. MF: There are two types of dog parks, large open spaces where people can exercise along with their dogs and small neighborhood fenced areas where people tend to stand around while their dogs play with other dogs. Do you understand the need for both types and when each is appropriate?

    MWL: I do understand the need for both types of open spaces for dogs.

  5. MF: According to the Trust for Public Lands (source: USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2011-12-07/dog-parks/51715340/1), nationally during the last five years dog parks were developed at a rate of 34% as opposed to all other parks which stood at 3%. Salt Lake County government has added no off-leash space in that same period of time. Salt Lake County operates only one off-leash area, Millcreek Canyon, which admittedly is a great resource. However, in light of the fast growing needs of this user group, what do you promise to do to develop more space for off-leash use of both kinds (particularly large, recreational open space) that are well distributed throughout the county?

    MWL: If elected, I will always listen to initiatives for off-leash opportunities and will work with those interested in the issue to find sustainable solutions that do not pit one group against another. If we can have open and honest dialogue about the overall needs of a community there is plenty of room for off-leash activity in connection with responsible stewardship over the dogs and the land.

  6. MF: There is a small but very vocal contingent of well connected people who oppose the use of open space for off-leash recreation. There is a much larger passive group who are forced to quietly break the law due to the lack of well distributed legal off-leash space (Even you might be part of this group!). Dog walkers are an easy target for criticism. Are you willing to stand up against a vocal minority to enhance the lives of such a large group of constituents?

    MWL: I would love to find a forum for the passive voice to be heard and work to meet the joint needs of the community. I believe in activating the passive and will do what I can to find ways to make this happen through education initiatives, open forums, etc. It is very difficult to assess the extent of a passive group until they are willing to speak up! For this reason, FIDOS is very effective in getting a message presented? you are active!



Paul Recanzone

  1. MF: Do you have a dog?

    PR: We do not have a dog at this time.

  2. MF: Do you exercise with your dog off leash?

    PR: When we have had dogs, we have found off-leash exercise very important. Growing up we had a Saluki ? known as the Persian Greyhound. He loved to run. I remember one time we let him run with us along a back road and we clocked him at about 35 MPH. Without off-leash exercise, he would have been miserable.

  3. MF: Do you consider us a viable user group that deserves open space to recreate with their animals off-leash?

    PR: Off course Millcreek FIDOS is a viable user group. All dog owners deserve open space to recreate with their animals off-leash.

  4. MF: There are two types of dog parks, large open spaces where people can exercise along with their dogs and small neighborhood fenced areas where people tend to stand around while their dogs play with other dogs. Do you understand the need for both types and when each is appropriate?

    PR: Both types of off-leash dog parks are important for dogs and their people; as are on-leash recreation areas.

  5. MF: According to the Trust for Public Lands (source: USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2011-12-07/dog-parks/51715340/1), nationally during the last five years dog parks were developed at a rate of 34% as opposed to all other parks which stood at 3%. Salt Lake County government has added no off-leash space in that same period of time. Salt Lake County operates only one off-leash area, Millcreek Canyon, which admittedly is a great resource. However, in light of the fast growing needs of this user group, what do you promise to do to develop more space for off-leash use of both kinds (particularly large, recreational open space) that are well distributed throughout the county?

    PR: Open space preservation and development is important not only for off-leash dog recreation but for the well-being of all valley residents. The County must balance the open space needs of dog owners, horse owners, non-animal owning residents, and all others. Doing so is not a simple task and requires careful consideration and wise stewardship of County resources. There is a distinct need to add off-leash recreation space in the County, especially in the southern and western areas. I will do what I can to expand off-leash recreation and other open space within the constraints of the County's parks and recreation budget.

  6. MF: There is a small but very vocal contingent of well connected people who oppose the use of open space for off-leash recreation. There is a much larger passive group who are forced to quietly break the law due to the lack of well distributed legal off-leash space (Even you might be part of this group!). Dog walkers are an easy target for criticism. Are you willing to stand up against a vocal minority to enhance the lives of such a large group of constituents?

    PR: Some dogs are so curious they have to investigate every passer-by. Others so enthusiastic they jump on strangers in their excitement to meet them. A few dogs are aggressive by nature. Dog walkers are only easy targets for criticism when their dogs are behaving in ways the frighten or bother other users of our County?s limited open space. I will certainly defend the freedom, opportunity, and security of all County residents. I will work to find ways to support both dog owner's needs to exercise their animals off-leash and non-dog owner's needs to use County open space without being afraid of dogs bounding on them.







Max Burdick

  1. MF: Do you have a dog?

    MB: Yes, I currently own a dog and have been a dog owner all my life. At many points we have owned/rescued many dogs.

  2. MF: Do you exercise with your dog off leash?

    MB: Yes, as often as possible.

  3. MF: Do you consider us a viable user group that deserves open space to recreate with their animals off-leash?

    MB: Recreating with animals is a great way to exercise. We are lucky to live in a state with so many recreation opportunities. I was instrumental in the creation of an off-leash dog park in Sandy because I recognize the need for off-leash open space.

  4. MF: There are two types of dog parks, large open spaces where people can exercise along with their dogs and small neighborhood fenced areas where people tend to stand around while their dogs play with other dogs. Do you understand the need for both types and when each is appropriate?

    MB: Yes, the two experiences are very different. Some people like to recreate with their dog so there needs to be designated space for dogs and their owners to recreate.

  5. MF: According to the Trust for Public Lands (source: USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2011-12-07/dog-parks/51715340/1), nationally during the last five years dog parks were developed at a rate of 34% as opposed to all other parks which stood at 3%. Salt Lake County government has added no off-leash space in that same period of time. Salt Lake County operates only one off-leash area, Millcreek Canyon, which admittedly is a great resource. However, in light of the fast growing needs of this user group, what do you promise to do to develop more space for off-leash use of both kinds (particularly large, recreational open space) that are well distributed throughout the county?

    MB: Millcreek has worked well because there was a compromise brokered between FIDOS, the Forest Service and other interested user groups. We should look at similar on-day, off-day rules. This is a good framework to use going forward.

  6. MF: There is a small but very vocal contingent of well connected people who oppose the use of open space for off-leash recreation. There is a much larger passive group who are forced to quietly break the law due to the lack of well distributed legal off-leash space (Even you might be part of this group!). Dog walkers are an easy target for criticism. Are you willing to stand up against a vocal minority to enhance the lives of such a large group of constituents?

    MB: This is an issue that is important to a large constituency, all sides need to be willing to compromise and come to the table to reach a resolution. I am willing to work with groups to help come up with a solution that is acceptable to all parties.





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